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AMBASSADOR'S ARTICLES

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27.11.2015 - Russia and Britain should beat Isil as we did the Nazis: together (by Ambassador Yakovenko for The Telegraph)

Sir Winston Churchill knew that faced with evil, Britain and Russia must stand united. As Britain debates its role in fighting Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil), Russia and others, including France, would welcome our British partners doing their bit to defeat this evil. As the atrocities in the Sinai, Paris, Ankara and other places show, we in Europe are in the line of fire, whether we are formally at war with Isil or not. Nobody is immune, nobody is safe. Did the half-hearted US-led bombing campaign save lives in Paris?


19.11.2015 - Vienna meeting on Syria: fighting terrorism should become a priority (by Ambassador Yakovenko, for RT)

With the world discussing ways to defeat the ISIS, we are witnessing positive momentum in agreeing a political process for Syria. A second round of constructive multilateral talks on the Syrian crisis was conducted a few days ago in Vienna, meaning that the International Syria Support Group has been established and is operational. One of its important outcomes is that specific steps have been outlined that need be taken with regard to the political process in Syria, notably the request for UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy Staffan de Mistura to convene a meeting with the Syrian government and opposition by 1 January 2016.


14.11.2015 - What Russia does vs doping usage in sports (by Ambassador Yakovenko, for RT)

In 2009, the National strategy for sport and physical culture was accepted in Russia. One of the cornerstones of the program was heavily stressed anti-doping control system. More numerous and sophisticated tests were used, bio-passports introduced, those found even suspect of doping usage were mercilessly banned – sportsmen as well as their coaches. The system was tried and tested many times, including by WADA (last time for some 6 months ago) – and was never considered wanting in transparently or thoroughness. The question, what has changed over these six months that WADA so dramatically changes its opinion, is an intriguing one, and deserves a special – but a separate – story. But for today, three key points should be clear from what information is available.


04.11.2015 - There should be no place for weapons in outer space (by Ambassador Yakovenko, for RT)

On 23 October 2015, on the margins of the UN General Assembly, the member states of the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) adopted a Joint Statement in support of the draft Treaty on the Prevention of the Placement of Weapons in Outer Space, Treat or Use of Force against Outer Space Objects (PPWT). Russia and its partners share the concern over the risk of an arms race in outer space and believe that it can only be addressed by means of a legally-binding instrument based on the current draft PPWT.


30.10.2015 - Chemical weapons in Syria: who is guilty

Against the background of many complex events occurring in the Middle East, the West continues to regularly accuse the Syrian government of using chemical weapons against its own population. And this is taking place in spite of the well-known fact that the process of chemical demilitarization of Syria has been actually completed, and all chemical weapons have been removed from the country long ago.


27.10.2015 - Facing down Isis threat in Syria together (full text of article by Ambassador Yakovenko for RBTH)

Isis established a bridgehead in Syria and other countries of the Middle East. The terrorists do not conceal their far-reaching plans for further expansion, destabilization of more countries in the region and beyond, recruiting more people from all over the world, including Russia and our neighbors, to fight for their cause.


28.09.2015 - Minding Isis Threat Jointly (full text of article by Ambassador Yakovenko for London Evening Standard)

Now, that John Kerry and Sergey Lavrov, Ashton Carter and Sergey Shoigu have talked Syria, and Gideon Rachman, Martin Wolf and Con Coughlin have spoken in the pages of their papers, it is easy for me to make out Russia's case for a united front against Isis. I could also cite Niall Ferguson, who dwells on Henry Kissinger's foreign policy philosophy (in the Foreign Affairs), which says, inter alia, that choices are rarely between good and evil, but rather between shades of bad.


11.09.2015 - On recent Chatham House pieces: minding Ukraine's and one's own business

Sir Andrew Wood writes of the 'flawed' Minsk-2, though he knows, as a diplomat, that those agreements stopped fighting when the Ukrainian forces, including so called 'volunteer battalions' were losing. So, they meant peace. He also knows well enough, that there is no middle ground between peace and war. Leon Trotsky thought otherwise when he stormed out of the Brest-Litovsk peace talks, launching his famous "no peace, no war".


27.08.2015 - The Middle East: learning from history or repeating it? (by Ambassador Yakovenko, for the Daily Telegraph)

The successful conclusion of the talks with Iran on its nuclear program is a rare bright spot on the otherwise gloomy horizon of the Middle Eastern affairs. That is a fundamental breakthrough, including in terms of political psychology, upon which, in theory, a sustainable regional architecture could be built.


22.08.2015 - Threats to cyber security can only be deterred together (by Ambassador Yakovenko, for RT)

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are being increasingly used for unlawful and hostile purposes that are inconsistent with the basic principles of international law. Some members of the international community are openly strengthening their cyber offensive potentials, forgetting that it could undermine international stability and security. The examples of ICTs being used as a means of achieving political goals are growing by the day. This also includes the expansion of extremist ideology and criminal activity. Under the circumstances, ensuring of cyber security on an agreed and acceptable basis by the UN member-states is the only way to effectively respond to the evolving threat. Having that in mind, Russia welcomes the UN Group of Governmental Experts' (GGE) recent report on this issue. An idea of an international code of conduct for information security has been discussed and the necessity of its adoption has been underlined. This fully reflects Russia's position on the issue. In 2011 Russia together with some other members of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization put forward a draft paper "International code of conduct for Information Security" that has been circulated as a "food for thought" at the 66th UNGA session. Later the SCO's members tabled a new version of this paper as an official document of the UN with the view to put emphasis on human rights. Besides, Russian draft resolution "Developments in the field of information and telecommunications in the context of international security" has been adopted by consensus at the 69th session of the UNGA.


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