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566 days have passed since the Salisbury incident - no credible information or response from the British authorities                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     558 days have passed since the death of Nikolay Glushkov on British soil - no credible information or response from the British authorities

SPEECHES, INTERVIEWS, ARTICLES

01.09.2019

Diplomatic failures of the 1930s should not be forgotten – Ivan Volodin

80 years ago, with the Nazi invasion of Poland, the Second World War started. The devastating conflict resulted in 85 million deaths worldwide, including 27 million in my country and 450 thousand in Britain. It took years, if not decades, for the world to recover from the huge human, economic and moral losses.

On this day, it is worth recalling how, blinded by mutual mistrust and ideological differences, eventual Allies failed to kill Hitler’s aggressive ambitions early on and to prevent the war. An anti-Nazi alliance, advocated by the Soviet Union since mid-1930s, was time and again rejected by Britain, France and Poland. The appeasement policy championed by Chamberlain and Daladier sought to bring “peace for our time”, but by September 1939 it had already resulted in the Nazis invading Austria (with West’s connivance) and Czechoslovakia (with West’s encouragement). Up until 21 August, Russia was seeking a meaningful military agreement against Germany. Only when these attempts had failed, Stalin chose a non-aggression pact with Hitler, a tactical victory that badly misfired in June 1941. By then, Britain and France had already paid their price for intransigence and indecisiveness, with Paris occupied and London badly bombed during the Blitz.

Ultimately, forces of freedom united to crush the anti-human Nazi regime. Many lessons have been learned. An early alliance would have saved millions of lives, not least those of the Holocaust victims. An aggressor and murderer is not to be appeased, and his promises are not to be believed.

Today, Russian-British relations are in a crisis. Accusations, mistrust and lack of high-level dialogue do not allow our countries to jointly address the many challenges the world is facing, from climate change and the rise of xenophobia to the inhuman terrorist ideologies and practices. Those who advocate a continued freeze in our cooperation should remember the lessons of the diplomatic failures of the 1930s.

Ivan Volodin
Chargé d’affaires a.i.

1 September 2019, 13:00




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Vladimir Putin and Sauli Niinistö made press statements and answered media questions following Russian-Finnish talks.


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06.08.2019 - Statement by the President of Russia on the unilateral withdrawal of the United States from the Treaty on the Elimination of Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles

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24.07.2019 - Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov’s interview with Latin American media and RT, Moscow, July 23, 2019

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